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TEMPLE MONKEYS AND HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF COMMENSALISM, KATHMANDU, NEPAL

Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Jun;12(6):900-6

Jones-Engel L, Engel GA, Heidrich J, Chalise M, Poudel N, Viscidi R, Barry PA, Allan JS, Grant R, Kyes R

University of Washington—National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. [email protected]

ABSTRACT

The threat of zoonotic transmission of infectious agents at monkey temples highlights the necessity of investigating the prevalence of enzootic infectious agents in these primate populations. Biological samples were collected from 39 rhesus macaques at the Swoyambhu Temple and tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, polymer chain reaction, or combination of these tests for evidence of infection with rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1), simian virus 40 (SV40), simian retrovirus (SRV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Antibody seroprevalence was 94.9% to RhCMV (37/39), 89.7% to SV40 (35/39), 64.1 % to CHV-1 (25/39), and 97.4% to SFV (38/39). Humans who come into contact with macaques at Swoyambhu risk exposure to enzootic primateborne viruses. We discuss implications for public health and primate management strategies that would reduce contact between humans and primates.

 

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